BEWARE —warning about TICKS

.
.
Danger on new leaves
Rimmed with first molting of ticks
Vectors of illness
.
.
Bear … 03 21.2015
ⓒBearspawprint2015

The first molting of ticks is even smaller than the seed ticks. They tend to be found along the edges of game paths or in high grasses and brush. In appearance they look like a soft edge of tan or light brown along the outer edge of a leaf or grass stalk or just a stick that protrudes where warm blooded animals, including people, birds, squirrels, deer, dogs, cats, etc., will brush against them.

I have had all different molting fall out of trees onto me, even into my coffee cup sitting at a picnic. And sometimes they jump, just appearing where they could not be without jumping several feet. They can be, and are, anywhere that warm blooded animals are or have been.

Motionless, waiting to ambush they look like nothing more than a film or rim dust or pollen. Under magnification they more resemble a mite than the adult ticks in most illustrations. BEWARE. These tiny vectors bite and carry disease, just as the adults do.

If it is possible that these practically invisible arachnids might be on your clothing, disrobe in a tub so that they are contained and not disbursed. Check children carefully. The nasty little critters especially like to get in armpits, under elastic (such as in waistbands), and tight clothing, on small boy’s testicles, and under skin folds in older people.

There are many varieties of ticks, and they are all over the world. It is my personal opinion that as wild-life habitat diminishes, and more animals are domesticated; ticks, and other potential vectors, are forced into contact with encroaching domestic animals and people. They don’t prey on us, as a preference, but we fit the habits of prey, and we are warm blooded.

Advertisements

16 comments on “BEWARE —warning about TICKS

  1. Bear this a scary subject for sure! Not to mention Belinda but also a friend from work got the Heartland tick disease that 10 people died from in the US last year. Luckily he did but he said he found 2 ticks on his already and I don’t know why he insists on clearing his land still and going where they are in the thick brush and woods. Scares me for people it truly does! Wonderful post Bear! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Johnny Ojanpera says:

    I’m glad you brought this up. I had a little one land on my shoulder yesterday. I am deathly allergic to ticks. Specifically, wood ticks. I was going septic 48 hours from my last bite. The infection is both topical and systemic, and I have tested negative for Lyme’s disease and RM fever every time it has happened. We are vigilant.

    Ticks have CO2 sensors like fleas and mosquitoes. They are built for survival. Be careful, Bear.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. willowdot21 says:

    Nasty evil critters I remember many years ago my neighbour came in to me and asked what I thought was attached to her little girls belly button i was not sure but suggested the dr’s because I had read somewhere you cannot pull “Thingies ” out. Luckily the Dr know it was a sheep tick and applied paraffin and then pulled the dead tick out with tweezers! A lucky catch ! Well done for the warning Bear!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Always something.

      Anthrax used to be called “The Weaver’s Disease”.

      Liked by 1 person

      • willowdot21 says:

        Yes the ticks are so much more dangerous than we realize. Xcx

        Liked by 1 person

        • Anthrax didn’t use a tick carrier. It was on the wools, not just sheep’s wools, but camelid and other wools, too.

          Ticks as vectors/carriers actually are worse than they used to be as there are emerging diseases, and the the old illnesses are spreading their range.

          It is fortunate that you have a good memory and were willing to look and try to figure out what to do for your neighbor’s child. Thank you.

          Liked by 1 person

          • willowdot21 says:

            I have noticed illnesses are getting more deadly and antibiotics are working less. Xx

            Like

          • That is a difficult one … we have made progress in many areas, such a learning how to use antibiotics so that they can be effective, in the right situations. It seems (some)folk were undermining the usefulness of antibiotics by using them wrong for a lot of years. Now if we can just implement what we now know … and ride out the consequences of the misuse … knock on wood

            Liked by 1 person

  4. That resonated in a million ways. Great post Bear!

    Liked by 1 person

    • The first molting is not even visible to most people. Small as a chigger, only not red, more transparent. For every one that survives to be an adult tick, there are thousands of these. Hundreds of them climb onto us, all at once. They are so tiny, yet they can move so fast … at first it feels like a feather softly softly gently brushing along the arm hairs, those thousands of bitty legs.

      Running and playing, a child might not notice.

      Working and caring for others, adults might not notice, either, especially if only one or a few climb aboard.

      It is not lack of cleanliness or anything like that. They can’t be brushed or rinsed off.

      I know you know all of this. I am writing it for others to read.

      EVERYTHING, around here, is thickly coated in pollen, just now. These tiny critters are invisible … unless one is hunting for them (not doing something else, such as watching birds), and knows exactly what to look for — AND the light is just right.

      😦 😦 😦

      Beautiful Belinda, I have to blog about these things every once in a while, lest folk become too complacent.

      Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever is increasing and spreading it’s range, as well.

      You did not invite Lymes disease, in any way. But you are one of the few who have transformed yourself by means of your suffering, into a glowing light of love. The ticks and the illness didn’t do that. Your love and God have worked that alchemy.

      Thank you for all that you have done.

      Liked by 1 person

Reply:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s