POOP SCOOP

.
.
Is there a
Documentary
That is not
Horse shit?
.
Is the entire
World history
Composed of
Road apples?
.
.
Bear … 02.06.2015
ⓒBearspawprint2015
.
.

Shale Formations Identified To House Nuclear Waste —- Now What???

So now even areas that we thought were safe from mining operations are to be contaminated by reverse-mines?  Is everywhere

to be  turned into watseland?  WE MUST STOP CREATING THE NUCLEAR WASTE IN THE FIRST PLACE.  STOP.  JUST STOP.

We are all relatives.    Bear

——————————————————————————————

USGS Newsroom

Technical Announcement: U.S. Shale Formations Might Safely House Nuclear Waste Released: 7/23/2013 11:00:00 AM

Contact Information: U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey   Office of Communications and Publishing 12201 Sunrise Valley Dr, MS 119 Reston, VA  20192

Shale and other clay-rich rock formations might offer permanent disposal solutions for spent nuclear fuel, according to a new paper by the U.S. Geological Survey. There is currently about 70,000 metric tons of this spent fuel in temporary storage across the United States.While no specific sites have been evaluated for storage potential in the United States, USGS scientists have looked at several research efforts, including projects that are underway in France, Belgium and Switzerland to confirm that shale formations in those countries are favorable for hosting nuclear waste repositories.

read more: http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=3647&from=rss&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+usgs%2FEnergyandMinerals+%28Newsroom+-+Energy+and+Minerals+Releases%29&utm_content=Yahoo%21+Mail#.Ue_z-4zD_cs

Oldest European Inland US Fort Found In Appalachians

Spanish moat, corner bastion, entryway, looking north. (Credit: Image courtesy of University of Michigan)

Oldest European fort in the inland U.S. discovered in Appalachians

Posted: 23 Jul 2013 08:37 AM PDT

The remains of the earliest European fort in the interior of what is now the United States have been discovered by a team of archaeologists, providing new insight into the start of the U.S. colonial era and the all-too-human reasons spoiling Spanish dreams of gold and glory.
Spanish Captain Juan Pardo and his men built Fort San Juan in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains in 1567, nearly 20 years before Sir Walter Raleigh’s “lost colony” at Roanoke and 40 years before the Jamestown settlement established England’s presence in the region.

 

 

 

Learned Wisdom — Bear’s Collection

When Dear Husband became mature enough to reveal his truly appreciative Heart with great Efforts at Attentive Thoughtfulness 

and overtly attempted to show the Depth of His Compassionate Understanding,

It became possible to Exemplify  

The Wise Repartee of Men in such an Eloquent Quote as:

“Huh? What are you going on about, now?!”

Not So Constant: Atomic Wights Changed for Five Chemical Elements

 

Link to USGS Newsroom


 

Contact Information:
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey
Office of Communications and Publishing
12201 Sunrise Valley Dr, MS 119
Reston, VA  20192

Standard atomic weights for chemical elements have commonly been considered as constants of nature, along with the speed of light and the attraction of gravity. Hold on to your Newtonian hat and prepare for the possibility of elementary nuances.

The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) Commission on Isotopic Abundances and Atomic Weights has published a new table that expresses the standard atomic weights of magnesium and bromine as intervals, rather than as single standard values. In addition, improved standard atomic weights have been determined for germanium, indium, and mercury. This new table is the result of cooperative research supported by the U.S. Geological Survey, IUPAC, and other contributing Commission members and institutions.

Modern analytical techniques can measure the atomic weight of many elements with such precision that small variations in an element’s atomic weight serve as markers for certain physical, chemical, and biological processes.

“The USGS has a long history of research in this field,” said acting USGS Director Suzette Kimball. “Through isotopic analysis, USGS scientists detect slight variations in atomic weights of various elements, which can be applied to a wide variety of mission-critical investigations, such as the identification of the geographic origin of materials, quantification of surface-water groundwater interaction, and understanding paleoclimatic conditions.”

“We are pleased to partner with the International Union [IUPAC] in this vital work,” Kimball added.

Atoms of the same element that have different masses are called “isotopes.” The atomic weight of an element depends upon how many stable isotopes it has and the relative amounts of each stable isotope present in a sample containing the element.

Elements with only one stable isotope do not exhibit variations in their atomic weights. For example, the standard atomic weights for fluorine, aluminum, sodium, and gold are constant. Their values are known to better than six decimal places. Variations in atomic weight occur when an element has two or more naturally occurring stable isotopes that vary in abundance, depending on the sample.

The standard atomic weights of magnesium and bromine will now be expressed as intervals to more accurately convey this variation in atomic weight. For example, bromine commonly is considered to have a standard atomic weight of 79.904. However, its actual atomic weight can be anywhere between 79.901 and 79.907, depending on where the element is found.

IUPAC previously adjusted the standard atomic weights of the elements hydrogen, lithium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, sulfur, chlorine and thallium as intervals to reflect variations in their atomic weights.

“For more than a century and a half, many students have been taught to use standard atomic weights — a single value — found on the inside cover of chemistry textbooks and on the periodic table of the elements,” said Ty Coplen, director of the USGS Stable Isotope Laboratory in Reston, Va. “Though this change offers significant benefits in the understanding of chemistry, one can imagine the challenge now to educators and students who will have to select a single value out of an interval when doing chemistry calculations.”

Practical applications of this research can be easily found in daily life. For example, precise measurements of the abundances of isotopes of carbon can be used to determine the purity and source of food products, such as vanilla and honey. Isotopic measurements of nitrogen, chlorine and other elements are used for tracing pollutants in streams and groundwater. In investigations of sports doping, performance enhancing testosterone can be identified in the human body because the atomic weight of carbon in natural human testosterone is different from that in pharmaceutical testosterone.

The importance of determining precise atomic weights has long been recognized. As far back as 1882, Frank W. Clarke, then a professor at the University of Cincinnati, prepared a table of atomic weights for use in science, industry, and trade. He carried on this work as Chief Chemist of the USGS (1883-1924). Clarke was a founder of the American Chemical Society and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Recently, IUPAC has overseen the periodic evaluation and dissemination of atomic-weight values.

The report, published in Pure and Applied Chemistry, also includes educational material and a Periodic Table of the Isotopes illustrating the relationship between isotopes and atomic weights.

Not So Constant: Atomic Weights Changed for Five Chemical Elements

 

Monsanto’s Roundup Herbicide – GLYPHOSATE

GLYPHOSATE

Monsanto’s Roundup Herbicide—Featuring the Darth Vader Chemical

Monsanto’s Roundup Herbicide—Featuring the Darth Vader Chemical

Published on May 10, 2013

It was “supposed” to be harmless to humans and animals—the perfect weed killer. Now a groundbreaking article just published in the journal Entropy points to Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide, and more specifically its active ingredient glyphosate, as devastating—possibly “the most important factor in the development of multiple chronic diseases and conditions that have become prevalent in Westernized societies.”
That’s right. The herbicide sprayed on most of the world’s genetically engineered crops—and which gets soaked into the food portion—is now linked to “autism … gastrointestinal issues such as inflammatory bowel disease, chronic diarrhea, colitis and Crohn’s disease, obesity, cardiovascular disease, depression, cancer, cachexia, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and ALS, among others.”
Enjoy this videotaped guided tour of Jeffrey Smith interviewing co-author Stephanie Seneff, PhD, a Senior Research Scientist at MIT.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=h_AHLDXF5aw

Monsanto’s Roundup Herbicide—Featuring the Darth Vader Chemical

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MP1I0cAsE2E&feature=player_detailpage

GMO Autism

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTx2TTBeGL0&feature=player_detailpage

GMO MS Leaky Gut

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ICCCXMvHek&feature=player_detailpage

GMO Parkinson’s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TAfG_UC2IsA&feature=player_detailpage

GMO – Alzheimer’s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JB4GFyjewHQ&feature=player_detailpage

GMO Obesity

(Some of the ways that) Depression & Anxiety Affect Your Body

Johns Hopkins Depression & Anxiety Health Alert
Contact Us www.johnshopkinshealthalerts.com | Johns  Hopkins Health Bookstore | |
How  Depression & Anxiety Affect Your Body

Most people think of depression and anxiety as conditions of  the mind, influencing one’s mood and outlook on life. But that’s only  part of the story. For many people, the more common manifestations of  depression are physical, not mental, and they can have long-term  consequences as well.

Headache. Chronic  headaches, particularly tension headaches, occur frequently in people  with depression and anxiety. Headaches are most likely caused by  contracting the muscles of the scalp and neck, which is a common  physical reaction when you’re under emotional  stress.

Diarrhea/constipation. Anxiety is often  linked with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which can manifest as  diarrhea or constipation. It’s possible that anxiety may make you more  aware of spasms in your colon or that anxiety affects the immune system  and may trigger symptoms of IBS.

Nausea/vomiting. These may be considered symptoms of mood and anxiety disorders. One  large study found that 41 percent of people who had major complaints of  nausea in the past year were eventually diagnosed with an anxiety  disorder, and 24 percent were diagnosed with  depression.

Heart disease. People who become  depressed after a heart attack are at increased risk for a second, fatal  heart attack, while people without heart disease who become depressed  increase their risk of developing or dying of heart disease. The  heart-mind link may also include anxiety, autonomic nervous system  dysfunction, inflammation and behavioral issues, as people who are  anxious or depressed are less likely to engage in heart-healthy  activities like exercising and healthy eating and more prone to weight  issues and smoking.

Osteoporosis. People with  major depression may have lower bone mineral density, a measure of the  strength of the bones, than those with no mood  disorders.

High blood pressure. Evidence suggests  that chronic anxiety may lead to high blood pressure. Anxiety is likely  to produce temporary spikes in blood pressure rather than persistent  hypertension. Frequent spikes can damage your blood vessels, heart and  kidneys and increase your risk of a stroke.

What an eruption at Yellowstone Super-Volcano would be like: Not so bad?

Lurking beneath Yellowstone National Park is a massive underground reservoir of magma, capped by the park’s famous caldera. 640,000 years ago, a super eruption rocked the region. What would happen if another such event blasted the park today? We asked USGS geologist Jake Lowenstern, scientist-in-charge of the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory.
Photo by Nina B via Shutterstock Most volcanic activity in Yellowstone would not qualify as “super eruptions,” in which 1,000 km3 or more material is ejected from a volcano. Lowenstern told io9 that supervolcanoes are “very large, single eruptions” that usually last for about a week. But, unlike what you’ll see in certain television specials and Hollywood films, even a super eruption at Yellowstone wouldn’t endanger the whole United States. It also wouldn’t cause the kind catastrophe you might expect. Damage from the Super Eruption A super eruption might come fast and the Yellowstone magma source is enormous. But don’t expect walls of lava pouring across the continent. Lava flows would be likely be “within the vicinity of the park,” Lowenstern said, limited to a 30-40 mile radius. When a volcano erupts, he added, at least a third of the liquid rock that’s ejected falls right back into the volcano’s maw. The rest lands nearby, or goes up into the atmosphere.

Most of the real damage comes from ejecta that’s airborne. But it’s not fiery death from above. Instead, most damage would come from “cold ash” and pumice borne on the wind. Lowenstern and his colleagues consider it “disastrous” when enough ash rains down that it creates a layer of 10 or more centimeters on the ground — and that would happen in a radius of about 500 miles or so. This ash might reach so far that you’d see a fine dusting of it on your car in New York. Air traffic would be grounded, of course, as we saw after the 2010 eruption in Iceland. But mostly this ash would pollute farms in the midwest, as well as the Mississippi River. In a sense, it would be like an industrial accident, clogging waterways and agricultural areas with toxic sludge. The worst outcome of this event would be the destruction of our food supplies and waterways.

What would it look like? A super eruption, like all volcanic eruptions, begins with an earthquake. “A lot of earthquakes have to occur to break the rocks and allow magma to get to the surface,” Lowenstern said, adding that we’d need some big ones in the weeks or months leading up to the eruption. That means there would be many warning signs before it happened — this eruption wouldn’t come out of nowhere. Next, enormous vents or fissures in the Earth would break open near the caldera, perhaps in a ring around it or maybe as far as 10 kilometers away. Lava and superheated gasses would shoot out of these vents very rapidly, draining the magma reservoir beneath the caldera. As the the magma quickly drained, the caldera would begin to crumble. Eventually, it would collapse in an oval-shaped sinkhole that might be roughly 50 miles long by 30 miles wide. SExpand After the vents released their gasses and the ground collapsed, it’s likely that we’d see a global effect on temperatures. “Any big eruption causes a cooling of the atmoshpere, especially especially with that much ash,” said Lowenstern. In 1812, the Mount Tambora super volcano eruption in Indonesia lowered global temperatures. A caldera-forming eruption in Yellowstone would be bigger than the one in Tambora, so climate change would almost certainly follow. The cooling, however, would only last for a few years. Lowenstern said there’s no reason to expect that we’ll have an eruption of this size any time soon, especially because the caldera has gone through many regular eruptions that release pressure. “It may be done, or it may move on to another area,” he said. “In a couple million years, [the volcano] might start in the northeast.” As continental plates shift, so too do volcanoes — so the Yellowstone supervolcano might not go off until it’s far beyond the area we call Yellowstone today. “A more likely eruption is going to be a lava flow, a small event,” Lowenstern said. Are there signs of an impending eruption?   Currently, the Yellowstone caldera shows no signs of preparing for a super eruption. That doesn’t mean that there aren’t regular earthquakes in the area — that’s just a natural part of being in a volcanic region. And the caldera itself rises and falls all the time, the ground moving up and down as pressure increases and decreases in the magma reservoir below. “It rose about 27 centimeters max over the past 6 years,” Lowenstern said. “Calderas are big and hot, so they don’t break very easily and they just move up and down. It’s the way heat and gas get out of these deep systems — the system breathes.” He added that if a super eruption were coming, “you’d need extraordinary activity,” something that went way beyond centimeters of movement and a few small quakes. Right now, the Yellowstone caldera is breathing normally, exhibiting behaviors typical of any massive hydrothermal system. Lowenstern and the team of scientists at the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory are constantly studying the caldera, looking for changes and working on projections of what the next eruption might be like. An eruption could “come at any time,” Lowenstern admitted. But would it be a super eruption? Probably not. And even if it were, the damage wouldn’t be the inferno you might be expecting. Instead of fleeing from hell on Earth, you’d just be slogging through lots and lots of ash cleanup. http://io9.com/what-will-really-happen-when-yellowstone-volcano-has-a-508274690

 

Google Time-lapse

Google Time-lapse offers view of Earth over 3 decades

(05/10/2013) Google has released a series of time-lapse images showing global change between 1984 and 2012. The images are sourced from NASA’s Landsat mission, a series of Earth-observation satellites that have orbited the planet since 1972, providing scientists, policymakers, and the general public with a wealth of data and imagery used for a wide range of applications.