Libraries

.
The Libraries
Repositories
He wants
The libraries gone
Censored
The smirk
Is not
Faust’s devil
All fools
Becoming ignorant
Fools
Fools following
Fools
Controllable
Swallowing whatever
Is not withheld
Thinking censored
Words restricted
Gone
Language is
Culture
Are children
History
Replaced
Servants
To be lost
In wordless
Obedience
Silent
Allegiance 
.
Bear 03.31.2019
©Bearspawprint2019

language

.

“Language expresses culture.

“The best way to modify, change, or destroy culture is to modify, change, or destroy language.”

Agawela ⓒBearspawprint2017

__________________________________

So many entire languages, and the associated culture, are already gone.

Language is now being used to manipulate culture, rather than culture creating language.

 

Symetry of Theft

.
.
Is jealousy of creation a part of  human nature?
Is it innocence to assume that all flowers
Are for the plucking? Is it righteous to
Reach out and take take take take take
Calling the self both messenger and author?
.
Is it human nature to pluck the best?
To hunt through the ordered gardens and the wilderness
Gathering the prettiest and the most significant,
Plucking the flowers from their context
And claiming, “Now this is mine.” ?
.
Why not take all the best that you can perceive?
Why not take what moves your soul? Take take, take take .
Take what brings some comfort.  Take take take take.
Why should the intensity of your wanting
Not be justification for thieving actions?
.
If there is beauty in the wild,
Is that Wildness available for the plucking?
Are there no consequences for your taking taking
Taking taking taking taking taking.
There is always balance in nature.
.
There are always consequences.
The flattery of your wanting is insufficient.
The Universe cares not for flattery.
When beauty flows into your heart,
Does that make you the author or the audience?
.
You vandalizing thieves who have destroyed
With your careless critical trampling;
You flattering greedy plagiarizing soul cannibals;
You deceive only yourself that you are the art,
Yourself the artist and the gardener.
.
You trolling gatherers of art’s life blood,
Think that there is no price to pay. Wrong.
Restitution is always made. Balance is a contract
With the Universe, made before the birth of beauty.
Think on symmetry when you claim what is not yours …
.
Da! Da! Da!
.
.
.
Through all strata of creation balance is maintained.
Bear … 04.23.2014
ⓒ Bearspawprint
.
.

Broken Wild Words

.
.
Entombing labeled words
Tangled through with cryptic barbs
Sharp walls of broken verbiage damage
Dance defiance ’round all meaning
Shadows darting in the language
Freedom in discernment
Wordless vocabulary of illusion
Refuse to recognize all reason
Defy judgments cold and dry
Claw searching for non defining key
Understanding shall set this wildness free
.
.
Bear … 02.10.2014

ⓒ Bearspawprint
.
.
.
.

Scientists Create Automated ‘Time Machine’ to Reconstruct Ancient Languages

Earth First! Newswire

Cross Posted from Science Daily

Ancient languages hold a treasure trove of information about the culture, politics and commerce of millennia past. Yet, reconstructing them to reveal clues into human history can require decades of painstaking work. Now, scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have created an automated “time machine,” of sorts, that will greatly accelerate and improve the process of reconstructing hundreds of ancestral languages.

View original post 672 more words

Animals Do Use Language

Article:

Mongoose Calls More Humanlike Than Thought

Megan Gannon, News Editor
Date: 15 January 2013 Time: 04:01 PM ET

                            Researchers found that the single-syllable call of the banded mongoose is actually structured, and perhaps like the vowel and consonant system of human speech. CREDIT: University of Zurich

While some animals like birds and whales are famous for their impressive repertoire of information-packed songs, banded mongooses blurt out short grunts that, to human ears, sound rather unsophisticated.

But a closer examination of mongoose calls has revealed that these animals might be more eloquent than previously believed. In fact, researchers say the creatures combine discrete units of sound somewhat like humans put together a consonant and vowel to form a syllable.

“The fact that such findings were done in a ‘simple’ species as the banded mongoose rather than in primates or apes could be revealing,” researcher David Jansen, of the University of Zurich, told LiveScience in an email.

 

The results suggest that the “simple” calls of other species — like frogs and bats — might actually contain vocal cues with more complex encoding.

For the study, Jansen and his colleagues followed around banded mongooses (Mungos mungo) in western Uganda, inside of Queen Elizabeth National Park. The small carnivores are related to the meerkat and found in the savannah regions south of the Sahara Desert. They live in social groups of about 20 adults that raise their young cooperatively. Their calls, which last between 50 and 150 milliseconds and can be considered to represent a single “syllable,” allow them to maintain group cohesion and coordinate activities like foraging.

The researchers recorded the animals’ calls to each other, noting what the creatures were doing at the time (i.e. digging, searching or moving). The team found subtle vocal signatures within the single syllables of the calls. There’s an initial sound that seems to provide information about the identity of the caller and a second sound (which Jansen compared to a vowel) that indicates the caller’s current activity. [See Video of Mongoose ‘Talking’]

Jansen said the research “adds an unexpected layer of complexity to the field of animal communication.”

 

“It shows that banded mongooses combine vowel-like segments in a way that was thought to be unique to human speech,” he added, noting that such elements might be found in the calls of other animals that speak to each other in single syllables.

“We think it is present in other species, and future research should attempt to find these,” Jansen wrote, citing frogs and bats as possible candidates.

The research was detailed online last month in the journal BMC Biology.