NOW

*
*
By My Secret Window
I am unable to sit.
Through the Magic Door
My spirit will not fit.
*
The weight of my body
Is an agony to bear,
Which I fail to sublimate
In the Universal Despair.
*
Living Alone
In my House of Pain,
Isolation is amplified
When I am too Sane.
*
I am Destroyed
By the Gone,
That Now shall Never
Be, though I Wish it anon.
*
*
Bear  11.29.2013
*
*
     

For 40 Years, This Russian Family Was Cut Off From All Human Contact, Unaware of WWII

In 1978, Soviet geologists prospecting in the wilds of  Siberia discovered a family of six, lost in the taiga

 

The Siberian taiga in the Abakan district. Six members of the Lykov family lived in this remote wilderness for more than 40 years—utterly isolated and more than 150 miles from the nearest human settlement.

                     The Siberian taiga in the Abakan  district. Six members of the Lykov family lived in this remote wilderness for  more than 40 years—utterly isolated and more than 150 miles from the nearest  human settlement.            (Wiki Commons)
Siberian summers do not last long. The snows linger into May, and the cold  weather returns again during September, freezing the taiga into a still life  awesome in its desolation: endless miles of straggly pine and birch forests  scattered with sleeping bears and hungry wolves; steep-sided mountains;  white-water rivers that pour in torrents through the valleys; a hundred thousand  icy bogs. This forest is the last and greatest of Earth’s wildernesses. It  stretches from the furthest tip of Russia’s arctic regions as far south as  Mongolia, and east from the Urals to the Pacific: five million square miles of  nothingness, with a population, outside a handful of towns, that amounts to only  a few thousand people.

When the warm days do arrive, though, the taiga blooms, and for a few short  months it can seem almost welcoming. It is then that man can see most clearly  into this hidden world—not on land, for the taiga can swallow whole armies of  explorers, but from the air. Siberia is the source of most of Russia’s oil and  mineral resources, and, over the years, even its most distant parts have been  overflown by oil prospectors and surveyors on their way to backwoods camps where  the work of extracting wealth is carried on.

Read more:

http://smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/For-40-Years-This-Russian-Family-Was-Cut-Off-From-Human-Contact-Unaware-of-World-War-II-188843001.html

Recommended Resources – The Stringer – Independent News, Investigative Journalism

am so glad that someone is paying attention at last. I’ve worked with visual impairments and audial. Of the two I observed that hearing impaired is more isolating than being blind. Besides which, middle ear infections are terribly painful. And any chronic infection is debilitating to the entire body, as well as the spirit. Kudos to Dr. Kong.