Shale Formations Identified To House Nuclear Waste —- Now What???

So now even areas that we thought were safe from mining operations are to be contaminated by reverse-mines?  Is everywhere

to be  turned into watseland?  WE MUST STOP CREATING THE NUCLEAR WASTE IN THE FIRST PLACE.  STOP.  JUST STOP.

We are all relatives.    Bear

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USGS Newsroom

Technical Announcement: U.S. Shale Formations Might Safely House Nuclear Waste Released: 7/23/2013 11:00:00 AM

Contact Information: U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey   Office of Communications and Publishing 12201 Sunrise Valley Dr, MS 119 Reston, VA  20192

Shale and other clay-rich rock formations might offer permanent disposal solutions for spent nuclear fuel, according to a new paper by the U.S. Geological Survey. There is currently about 70,000 metric tons of this spent fuel in temporary storage across the United States.While no specific sites have been evaluated for storage potential in the United States, USGS scientists have looked at several research efforts, including projects that are underway in France, Belgium and Switzerland to confirm that shale formations in those countries are favorable for hosting nuclear waste repositories.

read more: http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=3647&from=rss&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+usgs%2FEnergyandMinerals+%28Newsroom+-+Energy+and+Minerals+Releases%29&utm_content=Yahoo%21+Mail#.Ue_z-4zD_cs

Formosan Clouded Leopard Declaired Extinct

 

Clouded Leopard Declared Extinct in Taiwan

Douglas Main, OurAmazingPlanet Staff Writer –         May 01, 2013        07:53 PM ET
A Formosan cloud leopard, now extinct in Taiwan.

                            A Formosan clouded leopard, now extinct in Taiwan. CREDIT: Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Republic of China (Taiwan)

The Formosan clouded leopard, a clouded-leopard subspecies native to Taiwan, is now extinct, according to a team of zoologists.

“There is little chance that the clouded leopard still exists in Taiwan,” zoologist Chiang Po-jen told Taiwan’s Central News Agency (CNA). “There may be a few of them, but we do not think they exist in any significant numbers.”

Zoologists from Taiwan and the United States have looked for the animal on and off since 2001, to no avail. To see if any of the animals remained, the researchers set up about 1,500 infrared cameras and scent traps in the Taiwanese mountains but found nothing.

Now, the only one left in the country is a stuffed specimen at the National Taiwan Museum, zoologist Liu Jian-nan told CNA. There are two live clouded leopards at Taipei Zoo, but they are an imported subspecies from Southeast Asia.

The range of clouded leopards (Neofelis nebulosa) spans from the hills of the Himalayas to Southeast Asia to China. The animals are known for the patches on their fur that resemble clouds. They also sport fangs larger than those of any other feline.

In 2006, research revealed that clouded leopards found in the Sunda Islands of Southeast Asia — which which include Borneo, Java, Sumatra and Bali — were a separate species, now known as Sunda clouded leopards (Neofelis diardi).

Formosan clouded leopards, which were not thought to be a separate species, have been driven to extinction by habitat destruction and illegal hunting for their skin and bones.

Gorillas in the Mist

Dian Fossey’s story in the film Gorillas in the Mist  closely follows her own autobiography

also titled Gorillas in the Mist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Devastating Bat-killing Disease Reaches Georgia

Earth First! Newswire

 Second State Announced in Two Dayswhitenose

ByThe Center for Biological Diversity

A lethal bat disease sweeping across North America has been discovered for the first time in Georgia, state and federal officials announced today. The announcement comes one day after the disease was reported in South Carolina. White-nose syndrome, a fatal fungal disease in bats, has now spread to 22 states and 5 Canadian provinces over the past seven years. This most recent discovery of the disease was made at two caves in Dade County, Ga. — one in the Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, operated by the National Park Service, and the other at Cloudland Canyon State Park. Last year the bat disease was documented on the Tennessee side of the same national military park.

“White-nose syndrome’s attack on North American bats is continuing unabated,” said Mollie Matteson, a bat specialist at the Center for Biological…

View original post 297 more words

Feb 12—-Wolves in France

 

FLORA AND FAUNA France reshuffles the pack in bid to end wolf wrangle Paris (AFP) Feb 07, 2013 – Can you teach a wolf not to eat sheep? The idea is being floated in France, where the return of the wolf has got farmers and environmentalists at each other’s throats. Under a proposed “National Wolf Plan,” the government says it will conduct experiments into “educating” the canine carnivore, which is spreading stealthily in remote areas. Rest assured, this scheme does not entail lec … more

Orangutan Outreach Photo — What’s At Stake in Indonesia

gettingonmysoapbox

The Standoff  Orangutan Outreach

(Photo Credit: Orangutan Outreach. Copyright 2012. All rights reserved. No use whatsoever without the explicit written permission from the copyright holder.)

I do some pro bono legal work for Orangutan Outreach, but I’ve also adopted an orphaned/displaced orangutan (or two) through this organization. They do some great work helping to “protect orangutans in their native habitat while providing care for orphaned and displaced orangutans until they can be returned to their natural environment. Orangutan Outreach seeks to raise and promote public awareness of orangutan conservation issues by collaborating with partner organizations around the world.”

Here’s a great photo that we just registered for copyright. It’s called, “The Standoff,” and it shows the gentle and sometimes humorous personalities of these precious animals, who also share some 97% of our own human DNA.

How can you look at this and do nothing about the palm oil scourge that is destroying so much of Indonesia…

View original post 59 more words

Invasive Burmese Pythons are not only in Florida, they have already migrated to Georgia …

Burmese Pythons have already invaded Florida’s Everglades, and have now been found in south Georgia Swamps.

Even without a warming planet, this invasive predator can live comfortably in a third of the southern United States.

Pythons have been documented in two states, and may have invaded more areas, but have just not been officialy

recognized yet.  These snakes are a dangerous constrictor that grows up to twenty feet in lenth, making them capable

of eating fairly large animals, such as dogs, calves, ‘coons, ‘possums, and human children, or even small adults.  Though

not fanged like rattlers they do have lots of back pointing teeth which they use to secure prey while constricting.  These

are teeth that don’t get brushed or flossed and leave a nasty septic wound that needs treatment… if the prey (us) manages to get loose.

I don’t know if there is an open season on hunting and/or trapping/killing pythons, or if there may even be a bounty.  Hunting and Fishing laws are different in each state,  so before you decide to eradicate pythons, you best see what is legal and what is recommended.   ‘Cause I don’t know.

Granny

Areas of the continental United States with current climate matching that of the pythons’ native range in Asia. By 2100 the yellow “maybe” area is expected to extend north substantially, due to projected climate change. (Credit: USGS)

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080223111456.htm

Science News

… from universities, journals, and other research organizations

Python Snakes, An Invasive Species In Florida, Could Spread To One Third Of US

ScienceDaily (Feb. 24, 2008) — Burmese pythons—an invasive species in south Florida—could find comfortable climatic conditions in roughly a third of the United States according to new “climate maps” developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Although other factors such as type of food available and suitable shelter also play a role, Burmese pythons and other giant constrictor snakes have shown themselves to be highly adaptable to new environments.

The just-released USGS maps can help natural resource agencies manage and possibly control the spread of non-native giant constrictor snakes, such as the Burmese python, now spreading from Everglades National Park in Florida. These “climate match” maps show where climate in the U.S. is similar to places in which Burmese pythons live naturally (from Pakistan to Indonesia).

A look at the map shows why biologists are concerned.

Areas of the continental United States with current climate matching that of the pythons’ native range in Asia. By 2100 the yellow “maybe” area is expected to extend north substantially, due to projected climate change. (Credit: USGS)

The maps show where climate alone would not limit these snakes. One map shows areas in the U.S. with current climatic conditions similar to those of the snakes’ native ranges. A second map projects these “climate matches” at the end of this century based on global warming models, which significantly expands the potential habitat for these snakes.

Biologists with Everglades  National Park confirmed a breeding population of Burmese python in the Florida Everglades in 2003, presumably the result of released pets. Python populations have since been discovered in Big Cypress National Preserve to the north, Miami’s water management areas to the northeast, Key Largo to the southeast, and many state parks, municipalities, and public and private lands in the region.

“Wildlife managers are concerned that these snakes, which can grow to over 20 feet long and more than 250 pounds, pose a danger to state- and federally listed threatened and endangered species as well as to humans,” said Bob Reed, a USGS wildlife biologist at the Fort  Collins Science Center in Colorado, who helped develop the maps. “Several endangered species,” he noted, “have already been found in the snakes’ stomachs. Pythons could have even more significant environmental and economic consequences if they were to spread from Florida to other states.”

Control of exotic species is often prohibitively expensive once they have become established. Therefore, prevention through screening and risk assessment is of great importance, especially when protecting continental areas from invasive reptiles, said USGS invasive snake expert Gordon Rodda, also of the Fort Collins center. USGS scientists and their partners are seeking to compile the scientific data necessary to guide management efforts to prevent further introductions, control existing populations of snakes, and contain their spread.

Burmese pythons have been found to eat endangered Key Largo woodrats and rare round-tailed muskrats. “This makes it that much more difficult to recover these dwindling populations and restore the Everglades,” said park biologist Skip Snow, “and all the more important that pet owners be responsible in their choice of pet and dispose of it properly should they need to. Releasing them into the environment is bad for that pet, bad for native species, and also illegal.”

Currently, scientists with the USGS and Everglades National Park are investigating the behavior and biology of these snakes – that is, what are their requirements for survival? This information will help refine predictions of where the snakes might go next and their likelihood of survival. USGS researchers are also conducting a risk assessment for nine species of giant constrictors (including boa constrictors and yellow anacondas) that are prevalent in the pet trade and as such, potential invaders in the United States.

Due to be completed by early 2009, the assessment evaluates the risk of invasion for these species and the potential for social, economic, and environmental impacts. The two agencies are also developing and testing tools to control invasive snake populations and prevent their spread, especially to the Florida Keys where several listed species would be threatened by the presence of pythons or other constrictors.

http://www.gainvasives.org/index.html

View All Images at Invasive.org

http://www.invasive.org/browse/subthumb.cfm?sub=20461&Start=1&display=60&sort=2

Burmese python
Burmese python
Python molurus ssp. bivittatus Kuhl, 1820
Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Florida’s Exotic Wildlife Species Detail – Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database – U.S. Geological Survey Wikipedia – Wikimedia Foundation, Inc Everglades Burmese Python Project – Davidson College Herpetology Laboratory Python Snakes, An Invasive Species In Florida, Could Spread To One Third Of US – Science Daily Stopping a Burmese python invasion – Nature Conservancy Global Invasive Species Database – Invasive Species Specialist Group

Selected Images from Invasive.org View All Images at Invasive.org
Adult(s); Roy Wood, National Park Service, Bugwood.org Additional Resolutions & Image Usage Research; radio tagging Lori Oberhofer, National Park Service, Bugwood.org Additional Resolutions & Image Usage Research; radio tagging Lori Oberhofer, National Park Service, Bugwood.org Additional Resolutions & Image Usage
Research; Skip Snow wrestling python Lori Oberhofer, National Park Service, Bugwood.org Additional Resolutions & Image Usage Adult(s); Skip Snow, National Park Service, Bugwood.org Additional Resolutions & Image Usage Adult(s); Bob DeGross, National Park Service, Bugwood.org Additional Resolutions & Image Usage
Adult(s);  Lori Oberhofer, National Park Service, Bugwood.org Additional Re

EDDMapS Distribution:

solutions & Image Usage