Hawk with Badly Broken Wing

Hawk with a badly broken wing  ⓒ Bearspawprint 2014

Hawk with a badly broken wing ⓒ Bearspawprint 2014

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30 comments on “Hawk with Badly Broken Wing

  1. cindy knoke says:

    oh no! today the hawk dove on the roadrunner and the roadrunner ran to me for protection. can’t stand an injured hawk. makes me sad~

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Poor guy, I see it now. He is holding his wing oddly.

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    • Yes, Brenda. In the replies, quiall asked if he got help, and there is a more complete answer. With a question left, after all. He fell to the ground right in front of me, then climbed to that spot with his wing hanging, the bone exposed.

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      • Oh, how sad!! That can’t be good.

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        • I think, perhaps, there were some messages for me.
          1. My little granddaughter was my first priority
          2. We do what we have to do, even birds, and assume we will survive if we do everything we can
          3. Even the proud fierce should ask for help when its needed
          4. We should be selective about who we accept help from
          5. If someone you care for says “Help” respond instantly

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          • And we cannot help everyone.

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          • True. 😦 That hawk did NOT want me to help, he wanted the other hawk, and I couldn’t leave my granddaughter waiting. I, like quiall ,am an optimist about his being gone with no sign of a struggle 🙂

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          • Hawks have their own ways. Perhaps his mother will help him eat until his wing heals.

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          • They do do that. I hope his wing does heal. There are woods rats and voles (mice) that the hawks and owls and snakes keep down to a reasonable level. Without those predators there would be a plague.

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          • I think that’s why there are so many bugs. Not enough frogs anymore. We need our predators.

            Liked by 1 person

          • We have PLENTY of toads and tree frogs, here. They do a pretty go job, too. Though I have seen the toads try to catch the frogs….frog can jump farther and get away. Roy saw a little juvenile toad catch a palmetto bug, bigger that himself, and struggled to eat it. But he did. As these amphibians drink through their skin, insect sprays and other chemicals, such as fertilizer, and herbicides hurt them.

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          • Yes, the streams used to be full of frogs, and now it’s hard to spot one. We do have a toad living in our yard, though.

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          • Just One? Put some toad houses around 🙂 Things for them to hide under, such as half of a broken flower pot, sticks and old wood to border your gardens and walkways and pile the leaves around those things so they can dig in in the day to stay cool and damp. I have a child’s plastic swimming pool full of tadpoles (right now) and I’ve made a way for the toads to get in an out of the water, via a toad/frog stairway. They can’t climb the plastic sides and will drown if they can’t get out. Also the tadpoles can’t get out when they get their legs, unless there is something to walk(hop) up and then down on the outside. A nice little pond works too, as long as there is a way for them to get out, and it is not contantly filtered or filled with chlorine, etc. Diatomaceous earth hurts them, too. Toad like to kind of dig into the dirt a little bit when it’s hot, and hibernate when it is cold, so then have to have access to dirt, and the leaves to protect them from birds and disguise them from snakes, cats, each other, etc. Maybe tree frogs could get a start in your yard?

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          • Hmm, great thoughts. I do have a toad palace. 🙂 It’s an excellent place to hide under, and I have seen our big, fat toad near it. Perhaps he uses it. I do have a rhodie with lots of leaves under it. I am afraid to put out a pond because of the mosquitoes. Perhaps one day, when the kids aren’t playing on the swings anymore.

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          • The tadpoles and water bugs seem to keep the wigglers gone. 🙂 The water bugs like to have some leaves a debris to hide under. maybe some dirt and leaves and water plants to look nice or just for fun. maybe in pots, so you can take them out easily if you have to change the water due to wigglers (mosquitoe larvae)

            If I see wigglers instead of tadpoles, I dump ’em. Then the skeets have wasted that effort. I am worse about the pans under my plants. Those are more difficult for me to keep up with. I have had to reduce the volume of potted plants for that reason.

            I have another pool I use for dog water, it gets emptied and refilled everyday. But if I don’t have a toad stairway, there often will be a toad floating in the morning, waiting for rescue, which is being dumped. If the poor toad(s) is not rescued early, he will keep absorbing water until he dies, which is by about 10:00 AM. I am glad out skin is not that permeable!

            About 45 years ago I lived in an apartment above a garage, that was quite buggy. My little sister caught and brought me two little toads, which I kept as house pets. Soon the toads were HUGE and the apt was not buggy any more. They were funny to watch. Hop. Hop. Good at a very few things, catching bugs and catching bugs, and so very very VERY stupid about EVERYTHING else. CarrrrrOak Actually, some of them have almost sweet little tiny voices 🙂

            I learned a lot about toad habits with those two, and observing these wild ones.

            When my boys were little, well, bigger than little, but still little boys, when we drove home after dark, in the summer, we had toad patrol, to avoid running over all the toads on the dirt roads and drive way. Sometimes it took a long time to get home. 🙂

            When leaving to go anywhere they checked the tire wells, and, after one experience, under the hood, for cats.

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          • Great stories, Toads as house pets! How awesome! I love the toad patrol. My boys would love that! When we get home at night, most often we see bunnies in the clover. They are so used to us, they rarely even run away. Perhaps I will have to find a pot to half bury here and there. I have plenty of pots. 🙂 And leaves.

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          • Awww bunnies 🙂

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          • Yes, I always have to plant at least 20 parsley plants or I don’t get any. 🙂 Share and share alike. LOL

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          • Low fence or even raised beds. Hares can jump, but bunnies really can’t jump very high. Maybe tiers? With the goodies that you don’t want to share in the higher part? or those movable wire fences temporarily around the people treats? You can’t give it ALL to the rabbits…. and the rabbit’s cousins and second cousins and grandchildren, and brothers and uncles and aunts and friends and relatives they never met and squirrels and mice and coons and possums and durned armadillos and birds ….. Squirrels dig up bulbs …. doves follow me around with their beautiful gentle cooing, their soft gray feathers …. and eat all the seed! … as much as they eat, it seems like doves would be huge birds!!

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          • Do you know a swallow can eat 10,000 bugs in a day? Must take a lot of energy to fly. 🙂 So far my system of sharing has been working. Perhaps I will build a raised bed one day, if the effort becomes too great to want to share. I was a bit sad last year that they ate every shoot I had grown from a seed. All the tender young things. I can’t hate the bunnies. I like to see them eating the clover. I train most of the veggies up trellises and obelisks to defeat them, though, I must admit. I wish they would eat some oregano. I have too much of that. LOL

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          • Maybe put the oregano around the tastier things? I wonder if oregano would make moth repelling sachets? Or dried and put in pretty little jars, with a special Brenda Davis Harsham label for stocking stuffers. Who wouldn’t want one of those? Or oregano vinegar …. not likely to mildew or spoil 🙂

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          • LOL You are funny!!

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  3. quiall says:

    Did he get help?

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    • If you click on this photo it will enlarge, He is well camouflaged. He is calling his Mama, who came and circled over head. I could not stop as I was on my way to get my 3 yr old granddaughter …. I fill a scheduling gap. My son, her Daddy knows wild-bird, including raptors, licensed, “rescuer”. However, when I got back to this woodsy, off paved roads spot, both hawks were gone. Moses may have given his fri3nd directions, and he got there before I did, or the Mama (or mate?) gave him (her) cover to limp home to the nest. There is a family, which I am assuming these were part of, that hunts the nearby fields, and nests here, raising a family every year. I don’t know how he would fly as the bone is exposed, but then again,, even with birds, you do what you have to. Thank you for asking. There were no feathers or signs of a struggle, under this tree, when I looked, on my return. So it appears he flew. It was daytime. Only a coon or possum or bobcat would have been the danger in the tree, and they all hunt at night.

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      • quiall says:

        Thanks for responding. We can only hope. I know Mother Nature will balance everything but I am a hopeless optimist.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Well, I think that is the message intended, that optimism.:-)

          The hawk fell to the ground right in front of me, then climbed to that spot, with the wing hanging and the bone exposed.

          Proud and strong and fierce as the hawk is, when he needed help, he sure did say so!! Loud too!! and Mama or Mate of Friend or Sibling came right away. However the hawk was selective in who he wanted the help from. 🙂 That is another message. 🙂 🙂

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  4. I can’t see it, but I can’t like it either.

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